child photography

7 Compositional Techniques that will Transform your Photography Today!

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When I first started out in photography, I had no knowledge of any compositional techniques. I was completely focused on learning my camera, shooting in manual mode and grabbing focus ( which are all good and necessary things of course) So it wasn’t a surprise that my images lacked interest and creativity. I was pretty disappointed with my images as they looked more like snapshots than powerful storytelling photographs. My dissatisfaction grew until I realized I needed to understand some basic compositional rules . When I started utilizing these 7 techniques, it transformed my photography. There are more techniques than this, but this is a basic starting point. Here they are in no particular order.

  1. Rule of Thirds

  2. Leading Lines

  3. Framing

  4. Symmetry

  5. Leading Room

  6. Depth

  7. Size of Subject

    Utilizing one or more of these techniques will make your imagery stronger because they are ways of guiding the viewers eye towards the most important elements of your work- sometimes in a very specific order. Composition can transform even the dullest of objects or surroundings.

Let’s take a look at each technique in more detail.

  1. Rule of Thirds

    A guide line that proposes that an image sill has more energy and interest by dividing it into 9 equal parts by 2 vertical and 2 horizontal lines, and placing your subject along those lines… for example: The image of the plant below. Notice how the leaves( the subject of the picture) are on the right side? If you divided this image into the previously discussed grid, you would see that the subject is placed along these lines. The same idea applies to the image of my daughter potty training above.

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2. Leading Lines

This refers to a technique where the viewers attention is drawn to the lines that are leading to your subject….. for example, as you can see below, my son and daughter are looking out at something on the other side of the fence. Notice how the shadow of the fence is acting as a leading line, leading your eye right to them.

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3.Framing

This is a way to use elements within your image to fame the subject you are creating a frame within a frame . Some examples are doorways, windows curtains branches fences etc… The image above, my boys are being framed by the ceiling and one of my boys is also being framed by the window that he is looking out of. Below, my daughters sitting under one of my accent tables and the legs and top are framing them.

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4.Symmetry

This is referring to an imaginary line splits and image in half and both sides are mirror images of each other. In this case you can put a subject in the center of the frame. The image below of my daughter looking straight into the camera is the only one I could find as an example of symmetry. Technically it’s not symmetrical straight out of camera, but I darkened the background in post processing and she is now centered and the image appears the same on both sides.

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5.Leading Room

The space in front and in the direction of moving or stationary subjects….. Below my daughter is attempting to blow a dandelion and it’s important that there is space in front of her so that your eye can envision the direction the dandelion seeds will go. As you can see she had a hard time getting the seeds to disperse, but you can still imagine this happening because of the leading room.

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6.Depth

Basically giving a 2 dimensional image the feel of 3 dimensions. This is more engaging to the viewer and helps them to explore the scene rather than just observe. The image below of my daughter asleep on the dining room chair has a feeling of 3 dimentionality because of the layering. Notice how the refrigerator is closer to the camera and serving as a type of leading line towards the chair? The chair is the next closest object to the camera and then next up is my daughter. Notice how this all leads your eye from front to back giving the image more depth?

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7.Size

Using the relationship between two objects to clue viewers in on how big, or small your subject is. Below you can see how small my daughter is in relation to the shed and the trees surrounding her.

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So there you have it! 7 compositional techniques that will improve your photography. There’s no need to try and use all of these techniques at once ( Though you will find that some will naturally overlap) Focus on one technique at a time until you’ve mastered it. Once you feel you’ve gotten the hang of each technique, try adding multiple techniques together in one image. Which technique do you like the most? Let me know in the comments below!

Now stick around and head over to Child Photographer Tampa, Dana DiSalvo’s Blog and check out her most recent portrait session. So beautiful and inspiring, don’t miss it!

Interested in my FREE PDF on Lowlight Photography? Go ahead and grab yours below!

Portraits for Great Grandma (3 simple steps for a quick portrait)

Portraits for Great Grandma  (3 simple steps for a quick portrait)

“Dear Tanya,

You are doing so great with photography so I have a request. I need a pic of the twins together and identified and a pic of each of the other Grands. Could I send money to have this done? All done in portraits?

Lots of love Grandma”

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Bri Viglianco

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Bri Viglianco

What got you started in photography? 

My son is what got me started. My husband and I struggle with infertility and when it settled in that our son is probably the only child we will get I decided I needed to do a better job at documenting his childhood. Not just for him.. but for myself as well. 

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Amanda Barrick

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Amanda Barrick

What got you started in photography? 

While I've always known the importance of taking pictures, when my son was born in 2013, things got real. My own parents passed away when I was 9 years old, and growing up, photos of us became incredibly important to hold on to the memories of the details of our everyday life. Becoming a mom made it even more important to capture memories for my son to look back on in the future. Eventually I started to fall in love with the art of photography and I've been trying to capture our memories with that in mind ever since. 

Top 5 Tips for Making a Photo Session with Kids Easier

 

If you’re preparing for a photo session with your children, you may be feeling a bit apprehensive. Children aren’t always easy to deal with, which is why the below tips will definitely come in handy before your upcoming photo session.

1. Don't make a huge deal out of it. 

If you're stressed out and cranky, your kids will usually pick up on it and act accordingly. Their behavior will usually be better if you are relaxed and having fun. You may have to make some compromises to keep the peace such as letting your energetic daughter's hair stay straight instead of curling it into because she won't sit still. Focus on the big picture and don't sweat the small stuff.

2. Make it fun. 

Let the kids have a couple “fun pictures” where they get to pick their own pose or props. You get to keep the more serious photos while they get to keep their silly photos. This way everyone wins. If you are struggling to get your kids to sit still, turn the photo session into a game. Simon Says usually works like a charm.

3. Be prepared. 

If you're going to be out for several hours, ensure that your children are well rested and have had their nap. Bringing some snacks and activities along is also a great idea. If you are having your own photos taken too then you might want to bring a babysitter or family member along to watch the kids. If you happen to be shooting in a remote location, you never know when you might need something like bug spray, tissues or a first aid kit so bring that along too.

4. Be patient.

 Save your sanity by trying not to control the photo session too much. Sometimes the best photos come from kids just doing their own thing. Work with your photographer and your photos will look fantastic.

5. Have a chat. 

Get your children talking to both you and the photographer about topics such as school or their favorite songs. This allows them to feel more comfortable around your photographer and will also give your photographer a chance to capture a few candid and cute expressions.

As you can see here, I just let the child do what he wanted, just watched him play and documented what unfolded. 

As you can see here, I just let the child do what he wanted, just watched him play and documented what unfolded. 

Same thing here. Kids love to climb trees and this made for a cute image. 

Same thing here. Kids love to climb trees and this made for a cute image. 

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As you can see, this session went really well and I was able to get some really good Lifestyle images because The Littrell Family were so good at following these 5 tips. 

What are some tips you can think of that may help to make sessions easier? Comment below, I'd love to hear from you!

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Michelle Lourenco

It's been a couple of months since I last posted and I have been dying to get back to it! I have lots to share. It's been a busy few weeks with moving onto our new land and living in a camper while we prepare to build again. 

I am so excited to start up this series again and share with you one of my all time favorites, Michelle Lourenco. Enjoy getting to know this amazing artist!

 

What got you started in photography

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My husband bought me an entry level dslr several years ago, but I never really learned how to use it. It wasn't until I had my sons that I really wanted to learn how to document their childhood through photography. Cell phone pictures just weren't good enough anymore!

 

What three words describe your photographic style?

Moody, light inspired (sorry that two words), and raw.

 

What’s your favorite compositional technique? 

I'd probably say minimalism and simplicity. I like clean, clutter free images the best. 

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Tell me a bit about your biz! Are you only personal work, or a mix of personal and client?

I mostly do personal work, but I'll also photograph families, seniors, couples, and children as the need arises. I don't really market myself, I let people come to me. I have this fear of over doing it and then not really enjoying photography anymore. It's become such a passion and form of therapy for me.. I never want it to be a source of stress.

 

How would you describe your ultimate dream shoot or personal project? 

One where my boys would do everything I asked them to! Haha. Photographing kids is definitely my favorite. I've always wanted to get a diverse group of children today and photograph them in some gorgeous light just playing and enjoying each other without the stereotypes of the world. I just think it would be beautiful. Kids are so pure of heart.. I love watching them interact with one another. Also, I'd love to do a patriotic shoot! I'd love to get a service member from each branch of the military in their dress uniform and photograph them together symbolically showing a united front. 

 

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 What’s one of the most interesting experiences you’ve ever had in a session or personal project? 

Hmm.. I can't say that I've had anything crazy happen, but I've definitely learned to roll with the punches. Kids don't always act how you want them to, clients show up with extra family members for their session, dads can be stiff and grumpy.. I find that the more I let go of the image I had imagined in my head, I can capture the real raw moment and that's where it's at. 

 

What’s your favourite image you’ve ever taken (please share, and tell me the story behind the image)?

My favorite image isn't exactly the most spectacular image, but it is the first image that I felt really proud of. For the first time since I had seriously started learning photography, I felt like I was going to be able to capture my family how I had always dreamed of. I've never been looking for perfection, just progress and real moments. (I'll attach the image below).

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What advice would you give to someone wanting to get started in photography?

Learn your camera and learn the basics. Don't settle for shooting in auto.. It'll never get you the photos you desire. Most importantly, never give up or compare. Photography is your own artistic expression so what is beautiful to you may not be beautiful to someone else and that's okay. Comparison will kill your progress quicker than anything else. Just work towards being a better photographer than you were yesterday; it'll all fall into place that way. 

 

If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

You know, I'm really not sure! I have a bachelors degree in psychology and social and criminal justice, but I never worked in those fields. Photography has been the first career path that I've found such great passion in. I'm mostly a mom, but I'm hopeful that one day I can find a good balance and have a thriving business as a photographer.

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Favorite Quote?

"Beauty is not in the face, beauty is a light in the heart." -Kahlil Gibran

 

LR or PS?

Definitely lightroom. I use photoshop very minimally... it's rather overwhelming still.

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Any favorite presets?

I started out using tribe red leaf and I'll still go back to them sometimes, but lately I've mostly been using Mastin Labs Porta Pushed presets with quite a few tweeks.

 

Photographer/photographers who has influenced you the most?

Our first family photographer back in San Diego inspired me a lot! Her name is Amber Craig of Amber Craig Photography. I found myself so awestruck by her images and knew I wanted to have a similar style. I'll still message her with questions or just to chat about photography. In general though, I'm really inspired by photographers who capture real moments.. not so much staged with carefully picked out outfits. Also, photographers who have a dark and moody style.. that's my favorite! You and Cynthia Dawson are two of my favorites for sure!

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List any articles you have written, contests you've won etc... brag about your self!! can I get the links?

 

Eeek.. I don't really have a lot of brag worthy awards. I did enter shoot and share this year with one image placing as a finalist (364th out of 35,570 photos). I also had 10 photos in the top 10%, 10 in the top 20%, and 6 in the top 30%. The year before I only had one image in the top 10% and one in the top 20%. 

And there you have it!! Isn't she fabulous? Please go and check her out on Instagram and give her a follow HERE! 

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Cami Turpin

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Cami Turpin

I have another wonderful artist to share with you today! I am so excited to feature Cami Turpin of Blue Hill Images.  Cami is a Lifestyle family photographer who resides in the beatiful state of Utah. She is a Click Pro and MOD @theabstractlens on IG. 

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Jyotsna Bhamidipati

Photographers Who Inspire: Getting to Know Jyotsna Bhamidipati

Happy, happy Monday everybody! I'm so excited to be featuring the incredibly talented Jyo of mbmphotographs. She is an award winning & Intl Published artist, as well as a Click Pro and Clickin Mom's Mentor. She's a contributor to Offset and Cavan and......